Tag Archives: photograph

Choctaw Bowman


Choctaw Bowman - Military ManMy Grandfather (on the left) during WWI

At one time, it was easy to conceal your past. We have all heard stories of men who went West for a new beginning. It was easy, 100 years ago, to leave your past behind. Actually, it was difficult for your past to follow you.

When I attended my first defensive driving class (in the early 1970s) the instructor wanted to make a point about how we all had different degrees of training for operating a motor vehicle. He asked if anyone had received a drivers license without a formal test. Today, we would see this as a “set up” for calling in the officials to make an arrest, but in the 1970s, if we’d done everything by the book, we had no concerns. An old man in the group raised his hand and stated that he received his drivers license by filling out a form and paying 75 cents. That was it. No test, no training, no background check, no ID, no birth certificate to prove he was of legal age. 75 cents and a short form got him a drivers license.

We have all heard stories about Civil War veterans who joined the cause by lying about their age and joining their army of choice. This continued well into the 20th century. My Grandfather, Charles Bowman, lied about his age to join the infantry in World War I. I have to wonder if he questioned the wisdom of his decision. He saw plenty of bloodshed on the fields of France as a bugler in the infantry. However, he followed Black Jack Pershing, after the war, into the battle against Pancho Villa on the Texas border. He was a military man.

Eventually, he moved to Austin, TX with his young bride and became the first trolley car driver down the streets of ATX and continued his career with Austin Transit Company, eventually becoming the Vice President of Charters for the bus line. All of this under the name of “Charles Bowman”.

We did not learn of his duplicity until 60 years later, when he was too feeble for my grandmother to take care of in their home on 1509 6th Street. My older brother drove him from his home in Austin to the Veterans Hospital in Temple, TX. While checking him in, and presenting his enlistment papers to the administrators at the VA hospital, my brother noticed that “GrandDad” had joined the infantry under the name of “Choctaw Bowman.” The man I had known for 40+ years as “Charles Bowman” was, in reality, born “Choctaw Bowman”.

My grandfather had spent all his adult years under an assumed name.   Sometime after his military career, he decided that “Choctaw” was not a suitable name for a young man with career aspirations. At that time (1920s), all you had to do was to fill out paperwork with the information you wanted employers to believe was true. I guess they could have checked his military record and “outed him” but they did not. He continued his life under this new name, with impunity.

Things are not like that now. If  you were arrested in 1970, there is an on-line record of that. It is easy to find all the dirt on you that anyone might want to find. This brings me to a recurring theme. Your future employer will look for information on you on-line. If you are not found, they will dig deeper. If there is information that you do not want them to find, make it easy for them to find good information about you. Get your LinkedIn profile up to date (there is little reason to go back more than 20 years with your work history….no one cares that you bused tables in grad school).

Post updates about your good work and “good works”. If you wrote a published article, include a link to that on-line article on Facebook and LinkedIn. If you were awarded a patent, put that on LinkedIn. If you volunteer at the homeless shelter on Thanksgiving Day, post a picture on Twitter and an update on Facebook and LinkedIn. If you are not doing good things, start doing them. Earn new certifications. Update your programming skills. Brush up on Spanish at the community college. Do things that make you employable and make sure to broadcast that on social media.

If your future employer can find dozens of things about you on pages 1 – 20 with a Google search, there is little reason to continue on to page 21 where they may find images of you dancing the Hula with a giant Mai Tai in your hand. Make it easy for them to find the information that will make them want to hire you. Social Media is just as effective in getting news on the Internet as a press release. Make it work for you.

Good Luck and Godspeed.


How to Guarantee That I Will NOT Connect With You


I have a very liberal policy when it comes to connecting with people on LinkedIn. If you give me any indication that we have anything in common, I will connect with you. If you indicate that we have ever spoken or you have read anything I posted or we belong to any of the same groups, I will connect. If I can look you up on LinkedIn and find anything in common (we both went to the same school, worked at the same company, have common interests, worked in the same industry, are in the same line of work…) I will connect with you.

But, if you simply use the standard, “I’d like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn” and do not show me any common interest in your profile, I am only about half inclined to accept your invitation. If it appears that you might benefit me, then I might accept. This is hard to do unless you have some detail in your profile.

If, however, you appear to be a spammer or arrogant or selfish, I am not going to connect with you. I know a lot of people in Asia and am connected with several of them but I find that invitations from China or India from strangers almost always turn out to be spammers who want to sell me their web development services or search engine optimization services. It would be one thing if they sent me a single email but they send me three or four messages a week….that is spam.

If you get caught in that situation, here is how to “unconnect” with them. Simply write down the name of the person you want to unconnect with, then go to your Contacts on LinkedIn and look at the far right hand side (see red arrow in the following image) for the “Remove Connections” option.

Remove Connections

You will need to search through your connections to find that person you want to remove, but this will get them off your LinkedIn account.

One more thing to point out. Occasionally I talk about your LinkedIn profile picture. Many people are reluctant to put an image of themselves on LinkedIn but I encourage you to add a professional, friendly picture of yourself. It does not have to be a “coat and tie picture on blue background” but it needs to make a good impression of you as a professional person. About a year ago, I received an invitation from a total stranger who was promoting himself as an “amazing graphic artist that will rock your boring little world.” His profile picture looked like a gang banger. I understand that you need to show confidence but showing arrogance is never a good idea. I did not accept his invitation.

Good luck and Godspeed.

James Snider
Engstrom Trading, LLC
VP Business Development
214-377-9817

Photo…good idea? Bad idea?


I was volunteering in an orientation session the other day for newly released job seekers. The benefits of LinkedIn are always a part of these orientation sessions.  On this particular day, a person asked if it was a good idea to include a photograph on LinkedIn.  I hear this question from time to time.  Someone is too young or too old…too pretty or too ugly (I have heard both)…the wrong race (and that can be any race…everyone has concerns)…too fat or thin….the list goes on.

My two cents are as follows:

Put your picture on LinkedIn in most cases.  There may be some instances where  you would not want to…for example, you may want to get away from someone who wants to do you harm…a stalker, an ex, an old friend from a previous life style.  In those cases, maybe a picture is not a good idea.  But in all other cases, use a good picture.  Not your high school senior picture unless you are under 21 years old.  Not a cell phone picture taken in a dimly lit room.  Not a washed out picture that makes you look like a corpse.  Maybe a glamor shot is OK if it is not too over the top.  Make it a decent picture that shows you at your best.  It is just a tiny little photograph on LinkedIn, but I want to see who you are when I look at your profile.  Also, if you want to LinkIn with me, it is a much easier decision if I can at least see your photograph.  I like to link in with people I’ve met.   If I’ve meet you and can recognize you from your photograph, I will probably Linkin with you.

By the way, for what it is worth, recruiters who use LinkedIn to find people have a special option which does not show them the photograph from your LinkedIn profile.  This gives them some protection from Equal Opportunity legal issues.  That eliminates one concern I hear people express.

To not have a photograph just raises questions and creates barriers that do not need to be created.

For tips on your LinkedIn picture, I suggest this blog by EdenChanges.

James Snider
Global Business Development and Social Media Marketing
jsnider1394@gmail.com
817-905-1394
Anyone can give you social media.  I make sure it’s marketing.

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